Capturing taxidermied leopard heads encrusted with diamonds at the Tucson Gem Show with Rosie Clements

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Capturing taxidermied leopard heads encrusted with diamonds at the Tucson Gem Show with Rosie Clements


The work of Rosie Clements is full of beautiful quotidian captures, to say the least. Her lens unearths an artistic candour of even the most ordinary flashes of life, things we may otherwise ignore if not seen at a certain angle, in a certain light, or at a certain time. “At first, I felt like I needed to do planned shoots with models to be a ‘real’ photographer,” Rosie explains to It’s Nice That. “But during the pandemic, I fell back into the rhythm of going on daily wanderings to search for images.” That method became a “tool for mindfulness that came about in a very natural way” for Rosie, who attributes the growing realisation in-part to Jenny Odell’s book How to do Nothing Specifically – wherein Jenny says: “the granularity of attention we achieve outward also extends inward, so that as the perceptual details of our environment unfold… so too do our own intricacies and contradictions.” Taking this mantra with her into her work, Rosie now often captures the lives and happenings of her immediate surroundings in quick fashion.

Her latest work continues this trend, venturing deep into the beating heart of Tucson, Arizona, the photographer’s home of the last five years. It’s the Tucson Gem Show, “the largest, oldest and most prestigious gem and mineral show in the world,” according to the convention’s official website. “I’ve lived in Tucson for about five years now, and the Gem Show is this huge event that has happened every year since the 50s,” Rosie tells us. “It’s truly massive and takes weeks to set up and break down, and it has a huge impact on the local economy.”



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